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(Enlarge) Appraiser James Callear, inspects a pre-World War II teapot during last year’s Antiques Appraisal Day. This year’s edition is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 12. (File photo/2008)

Don't fret that you'll never be on "Antiques Roadshow" hoping to hear that that painting you purchased at a flea market is worth thousands ... or a few pennies.

The Historical Society of Carroll County's Antiques Appraisal Day will return for its ninth year next weekend, albeit without cameras to broadcast the excitement and heartbreak of appraising.

The event will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 12 at the American Legion Carroll Post 31 at the corner of Green and Sycamore streets, Westminster.

Timantha Pierce, executive director of the historical society, says she never gets tired of the comparison to the popular PBS show, but believes the Carroll County event has an advantage.

"People are used to seeing that, they know how it works -- we work in a similar way," she said, "But those poor people (at "Roadshow") have to stand in line for hours and hours."

Not so at the Carroll event, she said. Not only that, but patrons can partake of food and drinks, provided by the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary.

"We look out for their creature comfort," she said.

For a fee, guests can bring up to three items to be evaluated by experts: $20 for the first item, $10 for the second item and $5 for the third item. No buying or selling of items are allowed at the event.

This year's expert panel includes seven appraisers who specialize in antique clocks, coins and currency, rugs, watches, fine and decorative arts, jewelry, furniture, silver, glass, ceramics, toys and musical instruments.

Experts might be able to tell information about the manufacturer, the age and history of the items, Pierce said.

Last year's event raised close to $24,000. The money goes toward operation of the Historical Society of Carroll County.

Of course, there are highs and lows at such an event.

Pierce recalls one person who bought a necklace at a yard sale for 25 cents had it appraised for $1,500.

One man had inherited an antique bicycle from his grandfather, she said, and had quite a surprise.

"It was in almost new condition because when he was a boy the grandfather told him, 'When you learn to ride it, I will give it to you,' " she said.

"It came away as a price tag of $10,000."

But for every eureka moment, there is also a moment of murmured disbelief.

Pierce recalled the time someone came in with an IBM electric typewriter, and expected it would be worth a great deal.

"They were sorely disappointed," she said.

If you go ...

The Historical Society of Carroll County will present is Antiques Appraisal Day on Saturday, Sept. 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the American Legion, corner of Green and Sycamore streets, Westminster. Experts will offer appraisals of the value of art, furniture, coins, jewelry, clocks, toys and much more. The cost is $20 for the first object; $10 for second; $5 for third. Limit of three items. Call the historical society, 410-848-6494.


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