Search the Carroll County community newspaper archives


>> Click here to search for stories published AFTER 2011

>> Use this search box to find stories published prior to 2011.
Note: All Words is a more strict search. Implied operator is "AND."
Ex: Charles Dickens"
From
subscriber services email print comment


You may remember Crusader Rabbit, that cute-looking, fearless cartoon bunny who had a television show many moons ago.

He, along with sidekick Ragland T. Tiger, embarked on humane crusades such as going to Texas to stop Texans from making life miserable for jackrabbits.

If you ask me, County Commissioner Michael Zimmer isn't exactly Crusader Rabbit.

Zimmer is on a crusade, I admit, albeit a bit more ambitious, and perhaps not quite as sensitive to others creatures.

In his quest to find every possible way that he believes money is being flushed down the tubes in the county budget, no line item or job, apparently, excluded in his mission.

The list of cost-saving proposals he came up with could choke a horse, and would save an estimated $1.8 million in 2010, according to county budget officials.

In addition to specifying services he felt could be eliminated or reduced -- such as micro-seal road surfacing. -- he recommended salary cuts for county employees based on current earnings, including those of the commissioners, and specific elimination of two positions: a future county attorney position planned for FY 2011, and the job of current county Sustainability Coordinator Neil Ridgely.

In an article here in The Eagle Oct. 4, the commissioner went as far as to suggest Ridgely's position was a result of "leftist-leaning, biased theories."

Then, at a commissioner's meeting Oct. 6, when a vote was taken on approval of a stimulus grant of $250,000 (which Ridgely would be responsible for dispersing), only Zimmer gave it the thumbs down.

It passed anyway, 2-1.

I wonder how Commissioner Zimmer will explain his rationale for voting against this to his constituents, when the grant, through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, was specifically intended to make low-interest loans to make homes more energy efficient.

But my bigger question is why Zimmer seems obsessed with Ridgely?

Could it be that Zimmer suspects that Ridgely, staunch Democrat that he is, might be a "mole" in a Republican camp?

(Maybe he's seen the framed picture of President Barack Obama hanging on Ridgely's wall; or the bobble-head of Obama on Ridgely's desk, with a built-in recording, "Yes we can.")

Or maybe the commissioner -- as I did -- observed Ridgely at the intersection of Route 140 and Center Street during the 2006 campaign season, with large signs touting his choices for the Board of County Commissioners: Republicans Julia Gouge and Dean Minnich ... and Democrat Dennis Beard.

I must admit that when I happened to drive by that intersection, I nearly crashed into the concrete divider seeing the signs and Ridgely waving his arms.

If I didn't know better, I'd think he was warming up for a job the following month as Santa Claus at some department store.

Speaking of the holidays, I hope the jovial spirit and feelings of brotherly love that fills the air in the coming months may melt Commissioner Zimmer's heart, at least to the point that he's willing to bury the hatchet with Ridgely.

"The only crusade in this country today that I'd follow is the one led by the Canine Crusaders, who are dedicated to saving innocent dogs on death row."

-- Yours truly


user comments (0)


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Baltimore Sun: Baltimore breaking news, sports, business, entertainment, weather and traffic
xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Learn more about subscriptions
Learn more about subscriptions
Advertisement
Nancy K. Kopp, Maryland’s longtime state treasurer, announced Monday that she plans to retire from politics by the end of the year after more than four decades of public service.
Baltimore City Council passed a bill Monday that would create a special sign district in downtown Baltimore — the first step in a process that may pave the way for digital and video signage in the heart of the city.
Advertisement
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s redistricting commission has proposed a new set of maps for electing state and federal lawmakers going forward that appear to give Republicans a better shot of winning seats in Congress.
An MS-13 gang leader who pleaded guilty earlier this year to directing two murders in Maryland was sentenced to 45 years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Valley Food Storage consultedthe Federal Emergency Management Agency’s list of disasters and emergencies and selected key ways to stay prepared for a variety of emergency scenarios. Using information from government organizations like FEMA, the Ready Campaign, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Red Cross, dozens of steps to ensure you and your loved ones are safe should anything from a power outage to a nuclear explosion hit your area have been compiled. Visit thestacker.com for similar lists and stories.
Baltimore officials reopened the city’s renovated Towanda Recreation Center Monday nearly four years after the community hub closed to the public.
Anne Arundel County police responded to the Old Mill High School complex around 2 p.m. for a report of a possible armed subject who was in the area earlier in the day, the police department tweeted.
The first full week of mandates requiring all municipal workers in Baltimore and Baltimore County to either be vaccinated or undergo regular testing has begun, but tabulating the number of police and firefighters who complied remains a work in progress, officials said.
Sinclair Broadcast Group said Monday that it’s suffered a data breach and is still working to determine what information the data contained.
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is proposing that the Sykesville National Guard armory be named after the first Black person and first woman to lead the Maryland National Guard.
The kinds of serious outbreaks that legislators pointed to happening in other states before school started this year appear to have been largely avoided, thanks to a statewide mandatory masking mandate, as well as testing, social distancing and other safety measures.
Washington’s regional Metro system abruptly pulled more than half its fleet of trains from service early Monday morning over a lingering problem with the wheels and axles that caused a dramatic derailing last week.
Advertisement

Free Fun & Games

  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Daily Crossword
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Jumble Daily in color
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Daily Solitaire
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Bubble Shooter HD
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    2020 Connect
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Cookie Crush
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Butterfly Kyodai
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Classic Mahjong
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Daily Sudoku
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

The Baltimore Sun Store

Advertisement

GAMES & TRIVIA

Advertisement