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Baltimore Sun: Baltimore breaking news, sports, business, entertainment, weather and traffic
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The city’s decision will allow religious institutions to have tented outdoor services for up to 50 people with physical distancing and face coverings. Camps and childcare providers will be allowed to open on a limited basis, and hair salons and barbershops can reopen for appointment-only services.

The election board has received about 122,600 Democratic ballots as of Thursday, according to figures released by the state. That’s roughly 40% of those sent to the city’s 300,000 eligible, registered Democratic voters.

To keep Marylanders up to date with the week’s most pressing takeaways, here are five key points from The Baltimore Sun’s coronavirus coverage.

About 109 patients have transferred to the facility at the Baltimore Convention Center from 19 Maryland hospitals since it opened, staying for an average of five days, said Chuck Callahan, co-director of the field hospital and a doctor at University of Maryland Medical Center.

Maryland’s highest court reinstated a $200,000 judgment against a Baltimore Police officer for excessive force after the officer, who is white, opened fire on an black man during a traffic stop five years ago.

As Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan touts progress in coronavirus testing — expanded locations, no need for a doctor’s note — he continues to be questioned about whether highly-publicized tests from South Korea have been used.

The movement for LGBTQ+ rights in the US officially began all the way back in the 1920s. That's when Henry Gerber founded the Society for Human Rights, described as "the first documented gay rights organization" in the country. The society only lasted one year, however, due to police raids on the organization. The movement didn't pick up full steam again until several decades later, after the Stonewall Riots in New York City in 1969 galvanized activists to form the Gay Liberation Front. Even before the 1920s, some members of the LGBTQ+ community were not afraid to show their love as couples in photographs. In the 1960s and 1970s, however, as pride marches, parades, and protests erupted around the country, and in other parts of the world, a real photo history began to emerge. Images from the early gay rights movement are a reminder of how far we have come — and how far we still have to go — in recognizing the concerns of LGBTQ+ people.

BWI Marshall Airport had 2.18 inches of rain Thursday, shattering the record for the date of 1.26 inches set in downtown Baltimore in 1891, the National Weather Service tweeted early Friday morning.

Orioles executive vice president John Angelos discussed the club’s statement on the widespread protests against racial injustice and police brutality in a radio interview with ESPN on Wednesday.

The Maryland-National Capital Park Police are looking for a man after a video appeared to show him violently grab an object from a child who was posting signs protesting the death of George Floyd.

About 300 people gathered outside Baltimore’s City Hall Thursday afternoon for protests and speeches, marking the seventh straight day of mostly peaceful demonstrations

Was there a GOP “protest vote” against Trump in the Maryland primary? A noncandidate, Bill Weld, topped 20% against Trump in early returns in the state's two largest counties.

A Baltimore County Police officer took to Facebook to describe "the in pit in my chest" after watching "Floyd's last moments" on video.

Gov. Larry Hogan and Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser continued to disagree Thursday over the presence of Maryland National Guard troops in the nation’s capital.

U.S. Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Chris Van Hollen have introduced legislation that would replace the bust of controversial Supreme Court justice Roger Brooke Taney, who wrote the majority opinion in a case concluding black people were not U.S. citizens, with the first African American to serve on the high court, Baltimore's Thurgood Marshall.

Seeing Baltimore as ‘our city,’ a suburban Catholic church raised $500,000 in one weekend for a rec center and school on the southwest side.

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Races to Watch

Displays percentage of vote as distributed among the top candidates in each race.
See the full election results here »

Democrat: Mayor Baltimore City
Candidate
votes
Sheila Dixon
24,278
42.4%
Brandon Scott
19,685
34.4%
Mary Miller
13,280
23.2%
145 of 296 precincts reporting; 3 of 24 candidates shown
Baltimore City Comptroller Democratic
Candidate
votes
Bill Henry
37,864
51.6%
Joan M. Pratt
Incumbent
35,463
48.4%
2 of 4 precincts reporting
Baltimore City Council President Democratic
Candidate
votes
Nick Mosby
29,402
43.3%
Shannon Sneed
20,386
30%
Carl Stokes
18,090
26.7%
2 of 4 precincts reporting; 3 of 7 candidates shown
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Picturing Maryland is a new visual feature that showcases faces, places and events happening around us.

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